Religious worship – Waterloo Band http://waterlooband.net/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 17:30:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://waterlooband.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon.png Religious worship – Waterloo Band http://waterlooband.net/ 32 32 Olubadan charges religious leaders over the success of the 2023 elections https://waterlooband.net/olubadan-charges-religious-leaders-over-the-success-of-the-2023-elections/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 13:43:55 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/olubadan-charges-religious-leaders-over-the-success-of-the-2023-elections/ Faith leaders across the country have been called to intensify their prayers for the peaceful and successful conduct of the 2023 general elections. The Olubadan of Ibadanland, Oba Sen. Lekan Balogun made the call while graciously receiving the Archbishop of Ecclesiastical Province of Ibadan, Church of Nigeria, Anglican Communion, Bishop Abiodun Olaoye at his residence […]]]>

Faith leaders across the country have been called to intensify their prayers for the peaceful and successful conduct of the 2023 general elections.

The Olubadan of Ibadanland, Oba Sen. Lekan Balogun made the call while graciously receiving the Archbishop of Ecclesiastical Province of Ibadan, Church of Nigeria, Anglican Communion, Bishop Abiodun Olaoye at his residence Alarere, Ibadan on Thursday.

He noted that next year’s election, being a transitional one, “holds a very strategic place in the life of the country, given the current state of the nation.”

The monarch maintained that “the situation in the country seems to have challenged human ability and capacity and in this sense the only alternative is to intensify our prayers, therefore I ask you, our fathers in the Lord, not to not give up your sacred duty to pray for the country and you will surely pray to the end by the special grace of God”.

He assured the visiting clerics that he would use his position as supreme leader to speak to politicians about the need to address the myriad problems facing the country.

He, however, insisted that religious leaders have a greater role to play because virtually everyone who leads or aspires to lead at all levels of governance practices either Christianity or Islam and worships under their authority.

Leading a team of bishops and others on the visit, the Archbishop said in his address, “It saddens to hear or read daily of the cases of kidnappings, corruption, banditry and other social vices that seem to have gone on unabated.To those of us who suffer from all of this, it is time to examine the causes and come up with solutions together.

“The image of the country is daily projected into negative perspectives due to all these evil acts. As leaders, whether traditional, religious or political, we owe the citizens the moral burden of good governance because no one would be exonerated from blame if we all failed in our responsibilities to bequeath a nation that everyone, young or old, male or female, would be proud of, especially when our current generation would have been out of the limelight,” the cleric added.

The head of 17 Anglican dioceses located in the axis of Oyo and Osun states revealed that “the Anglican Communion recognizes the role of traditional leaders in nation building, especially at this time when our dear country faces serious challenges in virtually every field of human endeavour, and our visit is in part to salute Oba Balogun’s paternal efforts in this regard.

“We also call for collective action to address the challenges as we encourage everyone to be on deck to undo these incidents of decadence that have become canker worms that have deeply eaten away at the very fabric of this nation. Nigeria is a blessed country, filled with God’s grace and potential. We must all unite so that it becomes great again, ”he further urged the monarch.

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The Islamic headscarf: what are the religious rules on its wearing and why is it politicized? | SBS News https://waterlooband.net/the-islamic-headscarf-what-are-the-religious-rules-on-its-wearing-and-why-is-it-politicized-sbs-news/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:33:42 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/the-islamic-headscarf-what-are-the-religious-rules-on-its-wearing-and-why-is-it-politicized-sbs-news/ Thousands of women in Iran rise up against their government . In cities all over Iran, they burn the hijabs they are forced to wear. Protests have also spread to Australian cities. On Tuesday in Canberra, dozens of people gathered on the lawns of Parliament, chanting “women, rights, freedom!”, and holding up banners with the […]]]>
Thousands of women in Iran rise up against their government .
In cities all over Iran, they burn the hijabs they are forced to wear.
Protests have also spread to Australian cities. On Tuesday in Canberra, dozens of people gathered on the lawns of Parliament, chanting “women, rights, freedom!”, and holding up banners with the words “Freedom of choice!”.

The hijab – or headscarf – is often seen as a highly politicized symbol and is now at the center of a revolt against hard-line Iranian officials.

Tensions flared on September 16, when Ms Amini, also known as Jina, fell into a coma and died after being arrested by Iranian morality police for allegedly wearing her hijab improperly.

Frustrated by the rules of the Conservative government, dozens of women risk their lives defying the authorities, burning their headscarves and cutting their hair in the streets.

Around the world, women are cutting their hair in solidarity with Iranian women protesting against the government after the death of Mahsa Amini. Source: AAP / ANP / Sipa United States

But that’s a different story in countries like France and parts of India, where women have continuously fought for their right to wear the hijab – but they are forbidden to do so.

So what exactly are the Islamic rules regarding the wearing of the headscarf, and why do governments make decisions about how Muslim women can dress?

What does Islam say about the hijab?

Derya Iner, an Islamic studies researcher and lecturer at Charles Sturt University, said a hijab – which means “covering” in Arabic – is generally understood as a headscarf.
Muslim women wear the hijab in accordance with the widely accepted interpretation of two verses in their holy text, the Quran.

According to Dr. Iner, these verses have been read by many scholars to emphasize that Muslim women should cover their hair, neck and ears while wearing long, loose clothing as a sign of modesty.

Muslim women walking in Jakarta.

Four Muslim women wearing their hijab walk through Jakarta. The way Muslim women wear their hijab differs depending on their cultural attire. Source: Getty / Goh Chai Hin

It is understood that Muslim women who wear the hijab should only reveal themselves to other women and their close male relatives – their fathers, brothers, husbands, uncles and sons related at birth.

But Muslims believe that a hijab is more than just a headscarf. It also encompasses the modest social conduct in which Muslim men and women are expected to behave in public. This includes their behavior, mannerisms and speech.

Why do Muslim women wear the hijab?

Dr Iner explained that the “simplest explanation” for wearing the hijab is that her religion told her to do so, to explicitly display her worship.

“I try to follow the guidelines my religion has given me on how to be modest and that’s my choice,” Dr Iner said.

Women wearing different types of hijab and masks.

Muslim students protested against the headscarf ban at the University College of Brussels. Source: Getty / NurPhoto

Shakira Hussein, an honorary fellow at the National Center for Contemporary Islamic Studies at the University of Melbourne, said the hijab for Muslim women “symbolizes their faith, symbolizes their modesty”.

“More broadly and particularly when it comes to a religious minority, it is a symbol of belonging to that community,” Dr Hussein said.

Should Muslim women wear the hijab?

While some Muslim women wear the hijab, there are others who do not, but still identify as Muslim.
Some have worn it for years, but have changed their minds in subsequent years – and vice versa.
Dr Hussein said academics differ on their interpretation of whether it is mandatory and how much they should hedge.
But hijab is widely seen as a religious requirement that must be done of a woman’s own free will. Women can choose to wear it anytime in their life when they feel ready to commit to hijab.

“According to this interpretation, it is an obligation that one undertakes voluntarily. You can consider it an obligation, but it is up to you to do it or not,” Dr Hussein said.

“There are women who believe it is a religious obligation, but for some reason have chosen not to wear it.”
She explained that the reasons could include – but are not limited to – fear of harassment, Islamophobia and obstacles in finding a job.

“There are others who do not believe it is religiously obligatory but choose to wear it out of solidarity with other Muslim women as a statement of belonging to their religious community or as a stand against Islamophobia.”

Can women be forced to wear the hijab?

According to Dr. Iner, Islam prohibits acts of worship under duress. Thus, Muslim women cannot be forced to wear the hijab but must do so using their “own and free will”.

“Human beings are left alone to make their own choices. And if you do it not for the love of God but for the love of…your [country’s political] diet, that can be problematic,” she said.

She said that from an Islamic point of view, performing an act of worship without intending it voluntarily can invoke a sense of duality or hypocrisy, which is frowned upon in Islam.

“That’s not the divine point of view…It obviously dilutes the main concept of being a servant of God.”

So why are women forced to wear it in Iran?

Before the 1979 revolution, Iran was turning into a secular state.

In 1936, wearing the hijab was banned in Iran by then-ruler Reza Shah Pahlavi. A decade earlier in Turkey, the same decision had been applied. Dr Hussein said the women who came out were seen as a “symbol of modernity”.

Three young women walk down the street wearing hijabs.

Iranian women walk down a street in the capital Tehran, wearing their hijabs around their faces. Muslim women style their hijabs in different ways, depending on personal and cultural factors. Source: Getty / AFP/Atta Kenare

“It wasn’t that the government at the time was particularly feminist, it was just that having women wearing headscarves in public made the place look backward,” she said.

When the revolution took shape in 1979, Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini imposed the hijab mandate to establish the “Islamic Republic”.

From forcible unveiling to forcible veiling, Dr Iner said women’s visibility was used as a political tool to fuel their “so-called Islamist regime”.
“It’s a regime that just uses Islam in its words. That doesn’t necessarily make Islam responsible for what it does,” Dr Iner said.
“The women who burn the hijab, they don’t do it to protest against a verse of the Koran. They do it to show their frustration, the control of the bodies, but especially the regime and the way it treats minorities.”

“It’s part of a larger context of imposing this form of religiosity on a society, as well as, of course, patriarchy and controlling women,” Dr Hussein added.

Do Muslim women have a choice to wear the hijab in other parts of the world?

While women in Iran fight to remove their hijab, Muslim women in India face a major legal battle to enforce their right to wear headscarves in school.

In Karnataka, Muslim girls appealed to the Supreme Court after a ban on wearing religious clothing in educational institutions in February this year.

Since the ban was imposed to enforce uniformity, protests have erupted across the country as many hijab-wearing Muslims – who believe the hijab is a religious requirement – feel they must compromise their faith or their right to education.
In France, wearing the headscarf and “other religious symbols” is prohibited in all public schools, as well as for civil servants. In 2010, it became the first European country to impose a nationwide ban on face-covering burqas in public spaces, such as parks, public transport and open streets.

In France, women caught wearing the burqa in public risk a fine of 150 euros or the obligation to take citizenship courses.

It’s about controlling women’s bodies, but also trying to show the regime and the pillars of their government by instrumentalizing the visibility of women.

Dr Derya Iner

In Iran, the penalty for not wearing the hijab is imprisonment, a fine or flogging.
Other laws have also been passed across France, such as banning the hijab for lawyers in court, in sports competitions, and for mothers to participate in extracurricular school activities.
The “burkini” – long clothing for bathing at the beach often worn by women dressed in the hijab – is also prohibited on several beaches in the south of the country.
These laws were put in place by the French government in a “fight against separatism and attacks on citizenship” and to further establish a secular society.

Dr Iner said women in Iran, France and India face the same struggle: “authority is trying to control our bodies”.

A woman wears the hijab ban with a mask that says "hijab is our right, i support hijab" with a lit candle.

A woman supports her right to wear the hijab during a candlelight march to protest the ban on hijab in educational institutions in Karnataka, India. Source: Getty / Pacific Press

“At the end of the day, it’s about controlling women’s bodies, but also trying to show off the regime and the pillars of their government by instrumentalizing women’s visibility.”

“To be (hijabi) or not to be (hijabi) is the business of no state or man. Solidarity with women who resist patriarchal control, worldwide,” the activist wrote on Twitter. and author Yassmin Abdel-Magied.
Indian activist Tara Krishnaswamy described women in both countries fighting for their rights as brave.

“In Iran, women who take off the hijab are brave. In India, women who wear the hijab are brave. This is not a contradiction, it is resisting patriarchal hegemony and an oppressive state in both case,” Ms. Krishnaswamy said.

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Religious Freedom and Establishment of Government https://waterlooband.net/%ef%bf%bcreligious-freedom-and-establishment-of-government/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 07:02:33 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/%ef%bf%bcreligious-freedom-and-establishment-of-government/ On September 7, 1787, Jonas Phillips wrote an appeal to George Washington and the members of the Constitutional Convention assembled in Philadelphia. Phillips, a Jew, asked Congress to consider the religious liberty of Jews living in Pennsylvania – citizens who had “been faithful and faithful…during the last battle with England” who had “bravely fought and […]]]>

On September 7, 1787, Jonas Phillips wrote an appeal to George Washington and the members of the Constitutional Convention assembled in Philadelphia. Phillips, a Jew, asked Congress to consider the religious liberty of Jews living in Pennsylvania – citizens who had “been faithful and faithful…during the last battle with England” who had “bravely fought and bled for the freedom”.

The letter’s occasion dealt with a law in the Pennsylvania Constitution that required a religious test for office holders. The test Lily, “I believe in one God, the Creator and Ruler of the universe, the Rewarder of the good and the Punisher of the wicked – and I acknowledge that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments were given by divine inspiration. ” This last clause prompted Phillips to write to Congress, asking that the language be dropped. The Jews, after all, disagreed that the New Testament was divinely inspired. He held that “all men have a natural and inalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the precepts of their own conscience”.

Phillips criticized the notion of a religious establishment that thwarted principles of conscience to an intolerable degree, placing otherwise loyal and righteous citizens outside the scope of political participation. No authority, he said, should possess such power that could “in any way interfere with or control the right of conscience in the free exercise of religious worship.” This letter joined a host of many other religious dissenters throughout the 1780s and 90s, calling for the suppression of religion. Baptists, Quakers, Presbyterians, and Jews like Phillips all fought over the right to exercise their religious beliefs.

It is ironic that on the 235e anniversary of this letter, a Jewish university in 2022 implored government authorities for the same cause of religious freedom – a Jewish institution should fight for the right to be Jewish.

On Monday, September 5, Yeshiva University asked the United States Supreme Court to block an order requiring the institution to recognize an LGBTQ student organization. Last June, the New York Supreme Court argued that the Yeshiva must provide “full and equal accommodations” to this group of Pride Alliance students, despite the university’s policies and the religious views that guide its mission and vision.

Ari Berman, President of Yeshiva University, declared that “the Torah guides everything we do at Yeshiva – from how we educate students to how we run our dining halls to how we organize our campus… We only ask the government to allow us the freedom to apply the Torah in accordance with our values.”

On Wednesday, September 15, the United States Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision, refuse Yeshiva’s call, at least for now. The Court did not rule on the merits of Yeshiva’s case, instead stating that the university had two other avenues to make its case at the state level which it had not yet taken advantage of – if these measures failed, then Yeshiva could again take the matter to the Supreme Court. Judge Alito, author of the dissenting opinion, argued that at the bare minimum, the First Amendment protects religious schools from “the application by a state of its own preferred interpretation of the Holy Scriptures.” Indeed, Alito concluded, “A state’s imposition of its own binding interpretation of Scripture is a shocking development that calls for examination.

In answer at the Court’s decision, Yeshiva froze the activities and operations of all of its undergraduate clubs. Thus, not only was religious freedom lost, but most Yeshiva students suffered the consequences of a state-established theological claim on the issue of sexuality and gender. Shortly after this decision by Yeshiva, however, the university entered into an agreement with the student organization Pride Alliance. The LGBTQ student organization would maintain its claims to be officially recognized by the university as the case progressed through the courts, allowing other student organizations to resume operations.

Yeshiva is not alone in its struggle to function in accordance with its underlying religious worldview. Last year, thirty-two people deposit a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Education for applying religious exemptions to institutions of higher learning that the petitioners claim “discriminate” against LGBTQ students. Institutions such as Union University, Brigham Young University, Lipscomb University, Fuller Theological Seminary and Cedarville University were all named in the lawsuit, and the implications of the case were clear: either these colleges, universities and seminaries were to engage in the sexual revolution or they must lose their status under Title IX.

In short, the Yeshiva and other religious colleges and universities must conform to the newly established sexual orthodoxy.

Religious freedom, however, requires that religious institutions be allowed to operate according to their guiding religious principles and precepts. If Jews cannot be Jews, then how will Protestants be Protestants, or Roman Catholics be Catholics? A state-imposed sex establishment parallels the kind of religious establishment that dissidents have long sought to dismantle, and for good reason. The Supreme Court declared in Zorach v. Clauson, “We are a religious people whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being…When the State encourages religious instruction…it follows the best of our traditions. Because it respects the religious nature of our people. Attempting to eradicate genuine religious instruction therefore violated not only the American constitutional order, but also what it meant to be human. More recently in Carson v. MakinChief Justice John Roberts declared, “Educating young people in their faith, instilling in them its teachings and forming them to live their faith are responsibilities that are at the very heart of the mission of private religious schools. But that right is challenged every day, and the consequences come down to whether Christian institutions can continue to be Christian.
Jonas Phillips sought freedom for himself and other Jews to live freely in the United States. And on the 235e anniversary of his struggle, we are still witnessing the struggle and fragility of religious freedom – and not just for Jews, but for all of us.

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Transgender religious leaders use the Bible to make churches more inclusive: NPR https://waterlooband.net/transgender-religious-leaders-use-the-bible-to-make-churches-more-inclusive-npr/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 11:00:15 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/transgender-religious-leaders-use-the-bible-to-make-churches-more-inclusive-npr/ At its last General Convention, The Episcopal Church passed resolutions supporting gender-affirming care and developing resources to welcome and support transgender and non-binary people. Celeste Noche for NPR hide caption toggle caption Celeste Noche for NPR At its last General Convention, The Episcopal Church passed resolutions supporting gender-affirming care and developing resources to welcome and […]]]>

At its last General Convention, The Episcopal Church passed resolutions supporting gender-affirming care and developing resources to welcome and support transgender and non-binary people.

Celeste Noche for NPR


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Celeste Noche for NPR


At its last General Convention, The Episcopal Church passed resolutions supporting gender-affirming care and developing resources to welcome and support transgender and non-binary people.

Celeste Noche for NPR

PORTLAND, Ore.—Something as small as signs reading “men” and “women” on restrooms at a place of worship can close the door to trans people.

“For me, as a non-binary person, I’ve been to so many churches where there’s no bathroom that I feel like I can use,” says AJ Buckley, an Episcopal priest at Portland, Ore. “And so I just won’t go to the bathroom there.”

Churches are charged with living the message of the Bible both from the pulpit and in the pews.

And it’s hard to connect to spiritual concerns if those present to sing and pray literally can’t be physically comfortable.

That is why Saint David’s Episcopal Church of Wales in Portland, where Buckley has been associate rector for a year, made changes like putting up signs saying anyone can use any bathroom, including pronouns on name tags and preaching to “brothers and sisters in Christ” rather than to brothers and sisters.

“Sometimes we’ll say, ‘God loves you,’ but we don’t always experience it in church,” Buckley says. “And so to have these things that say you’re really wanted here, [means] we’re glad you’re here.”

Reverend AJ Buckley is Associate Rector of St David’s Episcopal Church of Wales and a member of the Diocese of Oregon Task Force implementing gender change and education.

Celeste Noche for NPR


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Celeste Noche for NPR


Reverend AJ Buckley is Associate Rector of St David’s Episcopal Church of Wales and a member of the Diocese of Oregon Task Force implementing gender change and education.

Celeste Noche for NPR

Pro-trans voices emerge within Christianity

Evangelical Christianity has played a big role in the political debate on transgender issues and in the wave of legislation to which it has led. And so this position is widely known: God created humans, separated into male and female – innate and immutable categories.

But religions speak with more than one voice. And other Christians use their scriptures to embrace a broader understanding of gender.

Shannon TL Kearns is the first openly transgender man ordained in the Old Catholic Church, a denomination that split from Rome after the first Vatican Council in the 19th century. He is co-founder of QueerTheology.comand author of the book In the Margins: A Transgender Man’s Journey with Scripture.

“The world of gender in the Bible is much more complex than what I was taught growing up as an evangelical,” Kearns says, pointing to many stories of biblical characters transgressing gender norms.

“We have women who are judges. We have men who spend their time in the kitchen. There are eunuchs, who were considered this kind of other third sex,” he says.

Many Christians Are Rethinking Bible Stories They Think They Already Know

Theology is stories. And Kearns says understanding the Bible’s message about trans people is partly about rediscovering those particular stories. But, in a broader sense, it’s about asking harder questions about the stories Christians think they already know.

For example, in Genesis, angels come to Sodom and Gomorrah, and the townspeople threaten to rape them. The destruction of these cities is often seen as God’s condemnation of homosexuality. But it could be read as a lesson in welcoming the stranger.

“When we look at a passage like Sodom and Gomorrah, we look at places where – where could we still be inhospitable to people today?” Kearns asks. “Do we benefit from systems that harm other people?

Sometimes showing hospitality is as simple as a sign on a bathroom door. And sometimes it’s harder. Not all congregations, not all Christians welcome these changes. Ordained Baptist theologian and pastor Robyn Henderson-Espinoza says conflict is not new to Christianity and is central to understanding the story of Jesus.

“I follow the story of a brown Palestinian Jew who was executed by the Roman Empire,” says Henderson-Espinoza. “And this story is painful.”

But Henderson-Espinoza, author of the book Becoming corporeal: a path to our liberation, says this recentering of history from the point of view of the weak rather than from the point of view of the powerful is the work of Christianity. And this refocusing has implications for trans people today.

“I think that’s how we bring heaven to Earth: to have these difficult conversations and create more relationships, and create more opportunities to relate to difference.”

Reverend AJ Buckley wears trans pride themed shoes at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church. Signs at the church invite people to use the bathroom of their choice.

Celeste Noche for NPR


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Celeste Noche for NPR

Trans people read themselves in scripture the same way all people see themselves in biblical characters

If you look in the Bible, the stories of difference are told there too Kearns theologian. The arc of scripture putting the most marginalized people at the center has always been there. But he’s not surprised it wasn’t always said that way.

“White, cisgender heterosexual men — they read their specificity and uniqueness and call it universal. And that’s the real damage,” Kearns says.

Kearns says it’s not that reading from a particular point of view, from a particular experience, is wrong – it’s the way Scripture has always been read and interpreted. People just need to be aware of what they are doing. And broaden the conversation to include all voices.

“I think we all read ourselves in the scriptures,” Kearns says. “I think the most important thing is that people in marginalized communities are honest about what they’re doing.”

Trans Christians practice a faith that matches their bodies

Good stories survive because they welcome a range of readers into their world. They don’t define the meaning—they reveal it to those who enter the story.

austen hartkeLutheran theologian and founder of the Collective of the Ministry of Transmissionasks the question: “If you believe, as I do, that God made me trans intentionally, then what does that mean that I am allowed to do to manage my body, to live a healthy and full life?”

Hartke, who is also the author of Transforming: The Bible and the Lives of Transgender Christianssays: “In the same way as if God created someone myopic, he has the right to have glasses.”

He says it’s part of Jesus’ call to abundant life. It is not a profanation; it’s co-creation. Holy work.

“Yes, our bodies are temples,” says Hartke. “But temples change.”

And Hartke says the blueprint for that change is in the text.

St. David of Wales’ Episcopal Church sees its mission as taking ordinary things (the bread, the wine, the congregation) and making them holy through prayer, song, and story.

Celeste Noche for NPR


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Celeste Noche for NPR


St. David of Wales’ Episcopal Church sees its mission as taking ordinary things (the bread, the wine, the congregation) and making them holy through prayer, song, and story.

Celeste Noche for NPR

“Even though Genesis One talks about binaries in the world, we know those binaries aren’t as crisp as they are in this one text.”

It’s not just man and woman, land and water.

“So, for example,” he says, “God creates day and night – it says nothing about dawn or dusk.”

But these intermediate places exist. Hartke says there is a richness in them and in the theology that emerges from them. Because they tell a fuller story of existence in this sacred world.

“If we say God is alpha and omega, we don’t mean God is just A and Z,” Hartke says. “We mean that God is everything.”

Reverend AJ Buckley delivers a sermon at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church.

Celeste Noche for NPR


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Celeste Noche for NPR


Reverend AJ Buckley delivers a sermon at St. David of Wales Episcopal Church.

Celeste Noche for NPR

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Supreme Court Issues PIL Opinion Seeking Action Against Deceptive Religious Conversion https://waterlooband.net/supreme-court-issues-pil-opinion-seeking-action-against-deceptive-religious-conversion/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 06:52:58 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/supreme-court-issues-pil-opinion-seeking-action-against-deceptive-religious-conversion/ Jhe Supreme Court issued an opinion on a PIL on Friday that sought a statement that “fraudulent religious conversion and religious conversion by intimidation, threat, deception through gifts and monetary benefits” violates Articles 14, 21 and 25 of the Constitution of India. It was also requested by the petitioner that instructions could be given to […]]]>

Jhe Supreme Court issued an opinion on a PIL on Friday that sought a statement that “fraudulent religious conversion and religious conversion by intimidation, threat, deception through gifts and monetary benefits” violates Articles 14, 21 and 25 of the Constitution of India. It was also requested by the petitioner that instructions could be given to the Center and the State to take strict measures to control him and, alternatively, that the court could order the Law Commission to prepare reports as well as drafting a bill to control “deceptive religious conversion”. “within three months.

The petition was filed following the suicide of a student at a school in Tamil Nadu in January 2021.

The application to the Court said that “the Center has failed to control the threat of deceptive religious conversion, although it is the duty under Articles 14, 21 and 25. It is empowered to make special arrangements at the benefit of women-children under Article 15 of the Constitution.. Freedom of conscience, free profession, practice and propagation of religion are also subject to public order, morality, health and others of Part III of the Constitution of India. “The Guiding Principles are positive instructions to secure political socio-economic justice; freedom of thought, expression, belief, worship, equal opportunity and the promotion of fraternity, guaranteeing the dignity of the individual, unity and integrity. But the Center has taken no steps to secure these high ideals,” the petition adds.
The petition pointed out that “the situation is alarming as many individuals and organizations are carrying out mass conversion of SC-ST in rural areas. Mass conversion of socially economically disadvantaged people, especially belonging to SC-ST, is on the rise These organizations have worked very well in socially and economically targeting the privileged strata belonging in particular to the SC-ST community.

The petition also argued that the intimidation and exploitation of the most vulnerable segments of society is mainly rooted in a wave of international conversion campaigns.

The petition also informed the court that the missionaries are placing the tribal belt as a target because the tribal belts are mostly illiterate areas. These areas are the most socially backward and this social backwardness opens up opportunities for missionaries to work among the lower classes for their socio-economic, cultural and educational development and through that spreading of the gospel message which ultimately results in conversion . It was also stated that if the blankets were left unchecked, Hindus would soon become a minority.

The application thus raised the following questions of law before the Court:

1. Does deceptive religious conversion violate Articles 14, 21 and 25?

2. Is the Center obligated to control misleading religious conversion?

3. If Apex Court can order the Law Commission to draft a bill?

Ashwini Kumar Upadhyay against Union of India and Ors. – GT (C) 63/2022

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700-year-old French religious document found in sale of prime estate: NPR Pipa News https://waterlooband.net/700-year-old-french-religious-document-found-in-sale-of-prime-estate-npr-pipa-news/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 18:14:00 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/700-year-old-french-religious-document-found-in-sale-of-prime-estate-npr-pipa-news/ PORTLAND, Maine – A bargain hunter who went to a Maine estate sale to find a KitchenAid mixer, a rack or some vintage clothing came away with a 700-year-old treasure. Instead of kitchen utensils, Will Sidery came across a framed document hanging on the wall. It had an elaborate script in Latin, accompanied by musical […]]]>

PORTLAND, Maine – A bargain hunter who went to a Maine estate sale to find a KitchenAid mixer, a rack or some vintage clothing came away with a 700-year-old treasure.

Instead of kitchen utensils, Will Sidery came across a framed document hanging on the wall. It had an elaborate script in Latin, accompanied by musical notes and gilding. A sticker said 1285 AD. From what he saw in manuscript class at Colby College, the document looked downright medieval.

Will Sidery bought a 700-year-old manuscript that was used in the sale of an estate in Waterville, Maine, for $75 from the cathedral in Beauvais, France. A manuscript expert said the document could cost up to $10,000.

PA. via Will Sidery

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PA. via Will Sidery


Will Sidery bought a 700-year-old manuscript that was used in the sale of an estate in Waterville, Maine, for $75 from the cathedral in Beauvais, France. A manuscript expert said the document could cost up to $10,000.

PA. via Will Sidery

And it was a bargain for $75.

Scholars have confirmed that the parchment is from the Divers de Beauvais, used in Beauvais Cathedral in France and dating from the late 13th century. He said it was used in Roman Catholic worship around 700 years ago.

A manuscript expert said the document, first reported by the Main Monitor, could be worth up to $10,000.

After spying on the unusual manuscript, Sidery contacts his former professor at Colby College, who knows him because there is another page in the college’s collection. The professor contacted another academic who had researched the document. He quickly confirmed the authenticity.

The scroll was a prayer book and part of priestly worship, said Lisa Fagin Davis, executive director of the Medieval Academy of America and professor of manuscript studies at Simmons University in Boston.

He noted that newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst had a comprehensive precedent before it was sold in the 1940s and split into separate pages for today’s scholars.

This practice was common in the early 20th century. “Thousands of unique manuscripts were destroyed and scattered like this,” Davis said.

Davis painstakingly researched the Beauvais Missal and found over 100 individual pages across the country. In total, the misal had 309 pages in its original form.

The page purchased by Sideri is of particular interest to academics.

It’s a treasure in both age and condition, far superior to the second page in the Colby collection, said Megan Cook, a former sidery teacher who taught medieval literature at Colby.

The price of the scroll is over $10,000 according to Davis. But Sideri said he had no intention of selling it.

He said he loved the history and beauty of the scroll – and the story of how he came across it.

“It’s something at the end of the day that I know is good,” he said. “I did not buy it in the hope of reselling it.”

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NI Census shows one in six people are not religious – almost double in just 10 years » Humanists UK https://waterlooband.net/ni-census-shows-one-in-six-people-are-not-religious-almost-double-in-just-10-years-humanists-uk/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 09:33:28 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/ni-census-shows-one-in-six-people-are-not-religious-almost-double-in-just-10-years-humanists-uk/ The 2021 census in Northern Ireland, released today, shows the number of people identifying as non-religious has nearly doubled. To the question “What religion, denomination or religious organization do you belong to?” », 330,983 people ticked None, against 183,164 in 2011, an increase of 80%. This represents a growth in population share from 10% to […]]]>

The 2021 census in Northern Ireland, released today, shows the number of people identifying as non-religious has nearly doubled. To the question “What religion, denomination or religious organization do you belong to?” », 330,983 people ticked None, against 183,164 in 2011, an increase of 80%. This represents a growth in population share from 10% to 17%.

More people identify as non-religious than as Presbyterian, Church of Ireland, Methodist or any denomination other than Catholic. Humanists in Northern Ireland said it showed it was time for politicians in Stormont to give non-religious ‘a seat at the table’, and that religious divisions in our education system ‘just aren’t not sustainable”.

The “Catholic” share only increased by 1%, from 41% to 42%. The share of ‘Presbyterian’ fell from 19% to 17%, ‘Church of Ireland’ from 14% to 12% and ‘Methodist’ from 3% to 2%. Those who checked “Other Christian” increased from 6% to 7%, “Other” (i.e. other religions) remained at 1%, and non-respondents decreased from 7% to 2 %.

The highest results for non-religious came despite the fact that there is a problem with the way the census question is phrased, in that the question assumes that people are religious. It therefore underestimates the non-religious part of the population. A better question is asked by the annual Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey. He asks “Do you consider yourself to belong to a particular religion? If yes, which ones ?’ One of the options is “No religion”. In 2021, 28% of the population ticked this box.

Northern Ireland Humanists Coordinator Boyd Sleator commented:

“The biggest demographic change in Northern Ireland over the last ten years has been the dramatic growth of non-religious people – and today’s census results confirm that.

“The implications of this trend are wide-ranging but, given that young people are more likely to be non-religious, they are particularly urgent for our school system. We now have an increasingly untenable situation where one fifth of the population is not Christian but 100% of our schools are. Compulsory Christian RE and worship in our schools simply no longer fits our society and the Assembly should bring about a radical overhaul of our education system in particular as soon as possible.

The census also asks a second question: “In what religion, denomination or body were you raised?” Many commentators and politicians use it to try to argue that people affiliate with one of the two historical communities in Northern Ireland: Catholic or Protestant. This is a problem because it may not take into account how people choose to identify themselves today. It should therefore be ignored in many contexts.

Remarks:

For further comment or information, media should contact Northern Ireland Humanists Coordinator Boyd Sleator at boyd@humanists.uk or by telephone on 07918 975795.

Visit the 2021 census campaign website.

Read it Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency 2021 Census Results.

As the census approaches, Humanists in Northern Ireland and Humanists in the UK have encouraged non-religious people to tick the ‘None’ box.

Read previous press releases from Humanists UK on this:

Northern Ireland Humanists is part of Humanists UK, together with the Humanist Association of Ireland. Humanists UK is the national charity working on behalf of non-religious people. Powered by 100,000 members and supporters, we advance free thought and promote humanism to create a tolerant society where rational thinking and kindness prevail. We provide ceremonial, pastoral care, education and support services to over one million people each year and our campaigns advance humanistic thinking on ethical issues, human rights and equal treatment for everyone.

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Religious freedom means nothing if religion means nothing, by Star Parker https://waterlooband.net/religious-freedom-means-nothing-if-religion-means-nothing-by-star-parker/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 19:28:36 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/religious-freedom-means-nothing-if-religion-means-nothing-by-star-parker/ In August 1790, President George Washington visited Rhode Island, which a few months earlier had ratified the American Constitution. Among those who welcomed the new president was the Hebrew Congregation of Rhode Island, founded in 1763. Now known as the Touro Synagogue, it is the oldest standing synagogue in the country. The synagogue representative wrote […]]]>

In August 1790, President George Washington visited Rhode Island, which a few months earlier had ratified the American Constitution.

Among those who welcomed the new president was the Hebrew Congregation of Rhode Island, founded in 1763. Now known as the Touro Synagogue, it is the oldest standing synagogue in the country.

The synagogue representative wrote to the president, expressing gratitude that the Jews of Rhode Island, in the newly formed United States of America, had lived, unlike their co-religionists in other parts of the world, with “rights invaluable as free citizens”.

Washington wrote to the congregation: “May the children of the stock of Abraham, who dwell in this land, continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitants; while each shall sit in safety under his own vine and his fig tree, and there will be no one to scare him.”

Just over a year later, the guarantee of religious freedom would be formally enshrined in the Constitution with the ratification of the Bill of Rights, including the First Amendment saying, “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of a religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof. »

Now, in a sad twist of irony, the religious freedom of observant Jews is being threatened not by “other locals,” but by their own co-religionists.

Yeshiva University, the only Orthodox Jewish university in the country, has been sued by gay students at Yeshiva University for refusing to sanction an LGBTQ club.

A New York State court ruled in favor of the students, and now Yeshiva University has suffered another setback from the Supreme Court. The Supremes, who Yeshiva University appealed, refused to block the state court’s decision requiring the university to allow the LGBTQ club to operate.

Yeshiva University’s position is clear. The Torah – the five books of Moses – explicitly forbids homosexual behavior. To officially accept the LGBTQ club as part of the university would negate and undermine the very mission and identity of the university.

Religious freedom is an integral part of American identity.

Historically, religious persecutions have come from those of other religions.

But today we have a new phenomenon.

The threat to religion does not come from those who worship other gods. The threat comes from those who worship no god and refuse to allow Christians and Jews to practice their religion as their scriptures teach.

An interview with one of the gay students clearly shows what is going on. She disputes that Judaism actually prohibits homosexuality.

But the prohibition in the Torah is absolutely clear and explicit.

To accept her and her argument is to ask Yeshiva University to deny her very existence.

How did Yeshiva University come to this situation? As I Googled background information on this story, it became clear that the problem with gay people on the Yeshiva University campus has been going on for years.

The LGBTQ club now seeking official sanction operates informally.

Could it be that Yeshiva University was not sufficiently clear and aggressive about its position on this issue, and that this lack of clarity led to this destructive situation?

I think it’s time for religious organizations to stop being intimidated by threats from those whose real goal is to destroy what they stand for.

Certainly, America must remain strong as a free society. Everyone should be able to live as they wish.

But Americans of faith should be proud and clear about the precepts of their religion and aggressively push back against those who use the title of toleration as a pretext to undermine and destroy the precepts of Scripture.

Let’s wake up that religious freedom means nothing if religion means nothing.

We are already seeing our nation implode as our sacred principles so essential to life go out the window. Those who still live by these principles must remain strong and inflexible towards those who want to destroy them.

Star Parker is president of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and host of the weekly television show “Cure America with Star Parker.” To learn more about Star Parker and read articles by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Photo credit: alisonupdyke at Pixabay

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Bayelsa denounces religious intolerance in Nigeria https://waterlooband.net/bayelsa-denounces-religious-intolerance-in-nigeria/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 19:39:02 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/bayelsa-denounces-religious-intolerance-in-nigeria/ Bayelsa State Deputy Governor Senator Lawrence Ewhrudjakpo. Sept. 19 (THEWILL) – The Bayelsa State government on Monday identified religious intolerance as a major causal factor for conflict, wanton destruction of life and property as well as lack of sustainable development in the country. The State Deputy Governor, Senator Lawrence Ewhrudjakpo made the claim when the […]]]>
Bayelsa State Deputy Governor Senator Lawrence Ewhrudjakpo.
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Sept. 19 (THEWILL) – The Bayelsa State government on Monday identified religious intolerance as a major causal factor for conflict, wanton destruction of life and property as well as lack of sustainable development in the country.

The State Deputy Governor, Senator Lawrence Ewhrudjakpo made the claim when the leadership of the South-South Muslim Ummah Association of Nigeria paid him a courtesy call at Government House, Yenagoa.

Senator Ewhrudjakpo, in a statement by his Senior Special Assistant on Media, Mr. Doubara Atasi, lamented that Nigeria ranks among the countries in the world with an unenviable record of high religious intolerance where the sanctity of life has been reduced to almost nothing.

He insisted that many lives and property were lost daily due to conflicts caused by religious fanatics, who had strayed from obedience to the commandment of love as espoused by the founders of the religions that they profess.

The deputy governor believed that the almighty God and creator of the heavens and the earth recognizes religious diversity, otherwise he would have forced man to practice one religion all over the world.

According to him, the administration headed by Governor Douye Diri would continue to provide and maintain an enabling environment for all religions to flourish in the state within the confines of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

To this end, Senator Ewhrudjakpo assured that the state government would not discriminate between Christians and Muslims in sponsoring pilgrimages to their respective Holy Lands.

Responding to their demands to have a Pilgrim Council of State Muslims as well as a central mosque in Yenagoa, the state capital, he promised to brief the governor on the issues.

He said: “For us at Bayelsa, we believe that we must provide an equal playing field for all faith-based organizations to practice their different religions. That’s why we treat you (Muslims) the same way we treat Christians and even traditionalists.

“The same will apply if we have Hindus and Buddhists; we will treat them the same way because it is not for us to judge who is right and who is not. It is the work of God. Man should do man’s work and allow God to do his.

“Thus, we will continue to sponsor Muslims on pilgrimages within the limits of available resources. We consider this our duty and responsibility as they offer prayers for themselves and for the state.

“One of the issues that is causing problems in this country is the very high level of religious intolerance, which is not the true worship of God. If God does not want a religion to exist, He has the power to stop it.

“Thus, we should stop unnecessary competition between our different religions and collaborate with each other to preach and practice love for this country to move forward.”

Earlier, the President of the Association of Muslim Ummahs of South-South Nigeria, Alhaji (Amb) Nasir Uhor hailed the efforts of the current administration to foster peace and harmony among the different religions in the State.

He explained that the establishment of a separate pilgrim council for the Muslim Ummah in the state would allow greater efficiency in the management of pilgrimage activities.

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September 18 Religious Services | https://waterlooband.net/september-18-religious-services/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://waterlooband.net/september-18-religious-services/ CHRISTIAN Agat Community Church Worship 11 a.m. Weekday service 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study and fellowship 6:30 p.m. Friday Filipino Christian Church of Guam Life in the Christian Community of the Son Sunday service at 10 a.m. with children’s church. Mid-week Bible studies at various locations. Abundant Life Church Sunday worship at 10 a.m. with […]]]>

CHRISTIAN

Agat Community Church

  • Worship 11 a.m.
  • Weekday service 6 p.m. Wednesday
  • Bible study and fellowship 6:30 p.m. Friday

Filipino Christian Church of Guam

Life in the Christian Community of the Son

  • Sunday service at 10 a.m. with children’s church.
  • Mid-week Bible studies at various locations.

Abundant Life Church

  • Sunday worship at 10 a.m. with crèche and children’s church.
  • Lifecell Gathering for North and Central Villages 7 p.m.
  • Friday youth meeting and intercessory prayer 7:30 p.m.

Episcopal Church of St. John the Divine

  • Office of the Eucharist on Sunday at 10 a.m.

Mariana Christian Community

Calvary Chapel Guam

Bible Fellowship of Christ

  • Sunday service from 10:30 a.m. to noon, broadcast live on Facebook.
  • Bible study 7 p.m. Wednesday.

Harvest Baptist Church

  • Sunday services at 8:45 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. with childcare and children’s programs for infants through sixth grade, with Japanese and Korean translations available at the 10:45 a.m. service; 6 p.m. combined evening service.
  • Midweek Prayer Gathering 7 p.m. Wednesday with Children to Christ for infants through grade six and HEART for Christ for teens, grades seven through 12.

Pacific Renaissance Center

  • Christian Education 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
  • Main service at 10:30 a.m. on Sundays.
  • Bible study 7 p.m. Thursday.

United Methodist Church of Guam

  • Sunday service 10 a.m., in person and on Facebook Live.

Presbyterian Christian Reformed Church of Faith

  • 10 a.m. service
  • Sunday school for children and adults 9 a.m.

CATHOLIC

Cathedral Basilica Dulce Nombre de Maria, Hagåtña

  • Saturday mass at 6 a.m. at the Saint-Sacrement chapel; 5:00 p.m. Mass at the Sainte Thérèse Chapel.
  • Sunday Mass at 6:00 a.m. at CHamoru at the Sainte-Thérèse Chapel; 7:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. (live stream), 11:30 a.m., 6 p.m. at the main church.
  • Mass during the week at 12.10 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Our Lady of Purification, Maina

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 8 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday.

Church of Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament, Agaña Heights

  • Saturday Mass 7 a.m., Vigil Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 7 a.m., 9 a.m.
  • Weekday Masses at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.
  • Mass at 7 a.m. on public holidays, no evening mass.

Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Hågat

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 9 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 7 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

Niño Perdido Y Sagrada Familia Church, Asan

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 7 a.m., 10 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 7 a.m. Monday through Friday.

San Vicente/San Roque Catholic Church, Barrigada

  • Saturday Mass 7:15 a.m., 5:30 p.m. (live broadcast).
  • Sunday Mass at 6 a.m., 10 a.m. (live broadcast).
  • Mass on weekdays at 6 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Our Lady of Peace and Bon Voyage Church, Chalan Pago

  • Early Mass Saturday 5:30 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 6:30 a.m., 10 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

Santa Barbara Catholic Church, Dededo

  • Saturday Mass 6 a.m., 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 6 a.m., 8 a.m., 9 a.m. in Astumbo, 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 2 p.m., 5 p.m.
  • Mass weekdays 6 a.m., 6 p.m.

St. Andrew Kim Church, Dededo

  • Saturday Mass 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 10:30 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday and Friday.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Inalåhan

  • Saturday 6:30 a.m., 6 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 8 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

San Isidro Catholic Church, Malojloj

  • Saturday Mass at 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 6 a.m., 8 a.m.
  • Mass during the week at 6.30 am from Tuesday to Saturday.

Santa Teresita Catholic Church, Mangilao

  • Saturday Mass 4:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 8 a.m. (live), 10 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

Church of San Dimas and Our Lady of the Rosary, Malesso′

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass at 6:30 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Friday.

Our Lady of Las Aguas Church, Mongmong

  • Saturday Mass at 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 9 a.m.
  • Mass on weekdays at 6 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

San Juan Bautista Catholic Church, Ordot

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 9 a.m., 6:30 p.m.
  • Mass on weekdays at 6 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Catholic Church of the Assumption of Our Lady, Piti

  • Early Mass Saturday 6 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 9 a.m.
  • Mass on weekdays at 6 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, Sånta Rita-Sumai

  • Saturday Mass 6:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 6:30 a.m. at CHamoru, 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6:30 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

St. Jude Thaddeus Catholic Church, Sinajana

  • Saturday Mass 5 p.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.
  • Sunday Mass 6:30 a.m., 8:30 a.m.

San Miguel Church, Talo’fo’fo

  • Saturday Mass 8 a.m., Vigil Mass 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 9:30 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.
  • Feast of San Miguel novena weekdays at 6 p.m., mass at 6.30 p.m. weekdays; Saturday novena at 4:30 p.m., mass at 5 p.m.; Sunday novena 9 a.m., mass 9:30 a.m.

St. Anthony Catholic Church, Co-Patron St. Victor, Tamuning

  • Saturday Mass 6 a.m., 5 p.m. (live broadcast).
  • Sunday Mass 9 a.m., 11 a.m. Mass for the people, 3 p.m. Youth Mass (broadcast live), 5 p.m., 7 p.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 a.m., 6 p.m. (streamed live) Monday through Friday.

Catholic Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Toto

  • Saturday mass with rosary 7:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. with rosary.
  • Sunday mass at 7:30 a.m. with the rosary; 11 am in Chuukese.
  • Weekday Mass with Rosary at 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Blessed Diego Luis De San Vitores Church, Tumon

  • Sunday Mass 7 a.m., 9 a.m.
  • Saturday Mass 5:30 p.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.

San Dionisio Catholic Church, Humåtak

  • Sunday Mass 8:30 a.m.
  • Mass on weekdays on Wednesdays at 6 p.m.

Santa Bernadita Catholic Church, Agafa Gumas, Yigo

  • Saturday 5:30 p.m. (live broadcast).
  • Sunday Mass at 6 a.m., 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m. (live), 11:30 a.m. in Pohnpeian.
  • Weekday Mass at 6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday (live).

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, Yigo

  • Saturday Vigil Mass 6 a.m., 6 p.m.
  • Sunday 6:00 a.m. at CHamoru (live stream) 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m. (live stream).
  • Mass on weekdays at 6 a.m., 6 p.m. Monday to Friday (live broadcast).

St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, Yona

  • Vigil mass on Saturday 5 p.m.
  • Sunday Mass 7 a.m., 10 a.m.
  • Weekday Mass at 7 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday.
  • Mass for the feast of St. Francis at 6 p.m. on October 4; Novena and Mass 5:45 p.m., 6 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Monday to Friday; 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m. Saturday; 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m. Sunday.

St. Fidelis Convent Chapel, Agana Heights

  • Mass during the week at 12.10 p.m. from Monday to Friday.

Mission Santa Cruz

Mass of the Ordinariate at 7:00 p.m. Saturday at the Chapel of the Boys of the Father Dueñas Memorial School.

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